Wednesday, September 20, 2006

Hector Ruiz supports HP's effort to hunt down the leaker

Hector Ruiz is a wise man. I found I agree with Hector Ruiz on most issues.

The guy who leaked confidential information should be hunt down and exposed. My original comment was here.

23 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hector.. hector.. hector

So good, so right.

But when it comes to AMD lets see.

When we are winners with benchmarks we want to challenge INTEL to a street competion.

When our benchmarks suck, as they do now... "benchmarks don't matter except to enthusiasts and gamers and they don't matter.

Lets charge as much as the market can bear. Opps are CPus are garbage, lets drop the price. We can't gouge the ethusiasts any more.

THis guy leaks all over himself. Damm is Hector that old and sorry that he has incontinence?

11:09 PM, September 20, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

So you think it's OK that HP spies on reporters and the reporters' family members?

Admit it, HP is in deep doodoo now, and will face the consequences.

11:20 PM, September 20, 2006  
Blogger Sharikou, Ph. D said...

So you think it's OK that HP spies on reporters and the reporters' family members?


What HP did was the right thing. If I were HP CEO, I would sue the leaking dude and the reporters right now for millions of damages. Of course, they dude and the reporters can file their counter claims. Let's see who suffered more damage and who needs to pay.

11:46 PM, September 20, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Yes, let the HP CEO sue former HP board member George Keyworth for leaking information confidential to HP, and CNET journalist Dawn Kawamoto for reporting it, for breach of contractual obligations.

Also let the CA attorney general and federal prosecutors file criminal charges against anyone who, in the process of identifying Mr. Keyworth, may have violated state or federal law.

1:18 AM, September 21, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

If you haven’t done any thing wrong or have any thing to hide, you don’t have any problem in being spied right?

That freedom crap sound too good, that everyone have to rights to this, to that, …, … but what about the obligations and responsibilities those people have ?

3:25 AM, September 21, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

HP was absolutely right to find the leaker, and I support them trying to find the leaker, but you and HP are absolutely wrong about how they went about doing it. Absolutely wrong, and HP leadership should be in legal and ethical trouble for instigating, helping, or condoning the practices.

The philosophy you are promoting is the "end justifies the means". Now if you want to take that philosophy it is your right in our society, one a strongly disagree with, but we don't want to hear you complaining when you end up on the wrong end of that philosophy.

Sue the reporters?!?!?!?!? A judge would dismiss that case in a minute, it is completely illogical. What law did they break? Or are you advocating that a wealthy corporation take someone to court who likely can't pay the legal fees and potentially ruin their lives for doing their jobs, and doing them lawfully. This sounds like the same type of bullying attitude that Intel has used in the past and that you, justifiably I might add, criticize them for. Be careful when you throw stones, unless you want to lower your reputation for being hypocritical.

Sue the director who leaked information? That does have some merit.

6:31 AM, September 21, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

My opinon

Any one who cant hold it and is incontenent should be flushed.

Why is it okay for the leaker to be above the law when he is clearly breaking it and those in power who push the limits of the law to find the incontenent at fault?

7:13 AM, September 21, 2006  
Blogger Sharikou, Ph. D said...

HP are absolutely wrong about how they went about doing it.

Everything has two aspects. HP was left no choice. What else could it do? Hiring private investigator was a smart move. Criminal charges? Bring them on. The private investigators will laugh at you. Such petty crime without any economic and physical harm will be fine $1000 at most. Anyone who did it already calculated the cost of that.

So you are talking about a $1000 fine "crime" (no more than overspeeding) and a treachery that damages a company and its stock, which is the worse?

I respect HP's determination to hunt down the leaker.

7:28 AM, September 21, 2006  
Anonymous a boy named sue said...

What is wrong with you people? America is full of litigious idiots. Sue him sue her sue this guy and that guy sue sue sue!

If the directors of corporations would be personally accountable for all the wrongdoings under their governance, sure. Sue away. But since there is no such thing as corporate responsibility to begin with, everyone can just sit down and be quiet.

Since pinning something on any CEO or board of directors in any American corporation is almost impossible, I would say shut the fuck up, grow up, and big whoopdie doo. So someone leaked she was going to get canned. OoooooooOOOOooo.

If she was stupid enough not to see it coming long before the board of directors started talking about axing her, she deserved to be canned anyways.

Sure, the guy who leaked it is a scumbag. But no more so than the rest of those fickle board members who sit around and plot how they are going to get rid of someone because numbers are down. Fair-weather scumbags who can't understand anything other than their own fear of shareholders. Now just like every other idiot people want to sue like mad. Grow up.

8:33 AM, September 21, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Why is it okay for the leaker to be above the law when he is clearly breaking it and those in power who push the limits of the law to find the incontenent at fault?

Because not only did HP commit identity fraud against the leaker, but every single member of the board. That's what? 9 felony counts compared to a breach of contract? Good, you got the leaker and violated 8 other people in the process.

9:24 AM, September 21, 2006  
Anonymous Graham said...

So you think it's OK that HP spies on reporters and the reporters' family members?

Admit it, HP is in deep doodoo now, and will face the consequences.


Amen brother. I expect anyone remotely responsible for this debacle at HP to lose their job and have difficulty finding work anywhere else.

Read here for just how deep the rabbit hole goes

9:42 AM, September 21, 2006  
Anonymous Graham said...

Be careful when you throw stones, unless you want to lower your reputation for being hypocritical.

This argument might work with some people. HOwever, since SHarikou's reputation is about as low as it can poossibly get he no longer has to worry about appearing hypocritical. Everyone already knows he is.

9:45 AM, September 21, 2006  
Blogger "Mad Mod" Mike said...

I love how everybody loves to come on Sharikou's Blog and make fun of him. I hear you all say he has no reputation, no credibility and you don't believe what he says -- yet you continue posting. Than you say "he's a retard" -- so why do you post? You say it's funny to read his posts, that he insults people -- what the FUCK do you think you assholes are doing?

I'm no preacher, I don't say "you who insult should be ashamed" because that's cliche bullshit -- I say this: Those who hate, hate away; your time is limited.

1:34 PM, September 21, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

All I can say is thank you Hector "Captain Obvious" Ruiz - and I was of the opinion all along that he was all for people/board members who leak confidential information - thanks for clearing that one up for us!

Next thing you know he'll be telling us the sky is blue and the grass is green.

"I think any board of a public company should embrace and passionately support the idea that the confidential information of the board should not leak out" (Ruiz)

Going out on a thin limb on this one - most other CEO's must apparently think that the board does not need to ensure confidential info not leak out? Good thing he went on record!

3:56 PM, September 21, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"What HP did was the right thing. If I were HP CEO, I would sue the leaking dude and the reporters right now for millions of damages. Of course, they dude and the reporters can file their counter claims. Let's see who suffered more damage and who needs to pay."


I think the board members put themselves in a position to be 'checked on' in a situation like this. I certainly wouldn't work with a company that would break the law to track me, but it could be reasonable to investigate this leak. To target the reporters outside the company is completely irresponsible, illegal, and immoral. How many people are going to buy a ‘Spy’ PC now… regardless of what’s running under the hood.

5:00 PM, September 21, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I come here to read about AMD 64.

I have no interest in reading Sharikou tell us that he has no ethics. I have no interest in him spouting the philosohy of the "end justifying the means".

I have no interest in the obviously impossible near term BK of Intel. I am an AMD fan and stockholder, but I can only take this stuff so long.

If Sharikou wants us to know his ethics are "flexable", why should we then trust anything he says? Maybe he is just pumping AMD stock by twisting the truth. I imagine in his mind that is OK because Intel has lied so often.

8:24 PM, September 21, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Dunn is gone already, but it would have been better for the company's public image if they had fire her on the spot when the news about the scandal broke. Instead, they continued the farce, kept her on the board and thus created more ill will towards the company

10:24 AM, September 23, 2006  
Blogger symbiansn said...

"Those that do not follow orders are trash, but those that do not protect their friends or comrades are lower than trash."

- From Naruto anime

People here are comparing HP to Intel. When it comes to Intel's dirty tactics, they may have an excuse: to support their overgrown number of employees. Problem is, millions of PC consumers are under damage from it.

HP's acts didn't cause damage to the public whatsoever. Do you know that most companies employ tricky tests which actually encourage workers to commit leaks of information? Self-defense is key.

Everything should be put on a balance, that's why Courts do exist.

3:18 PM, September 23, 2006  
Blogger Sharikou, Ph. D said...

Sharikou wants us to know his ethics are "flexable"

Dude, you confused about ethics and law. What HP did was perfectly ethical, hunting down the unethical dude who leaked information. It was the private investigators who committed petty crimes which injured no one.

What was unethical was the leak and the reporters reporting of such leak, knowing the source was providing confidential information.

SEC should investigate whether the leaker and reporters traded HP stock during the period to identify potential securities fraud.

3:22 PM, September 23, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Mad Mod Mike says" I'm no preacher, I don't say "you who insult should be ashamed" because that's cliche bullshit -- I say this: Those who hate, hate away; your time is limited."

Mad Mike thinks Bush was behind 9/11--go look in his blog. Now he says he is not a preacher. He is probably a Muslim cleric though, because he is full of crap.

4:17 PM, September 23, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"Mad Mike thinks Bush was behind 9/11--go look in his blog. Now he says he is not a preacher. He is probably a Muslim cleric though, because he is full of crap."

The US, UK, and Isreal were the implementers of 9/11.

The beneficiaries of 9/11 are mainly members of the Rothschild family. Not incidentally, the Rothschild family is the primary controller of the three countries above.

Only the dumbest Americans believe an ex-CIA agent sitting in a cave with his dialysis machine masterminded 9/11.

Somehow from this cave he then prayed to Allah and had all the video cameras turned off at appropriate times, made the buildings collapse straight down (including the one that wasn't even hit), etc, etc.

There is nothing dumber on this planet than an American.

5:26 PM, September 24, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The California attorney general is expected today to announce indictments against HP's former chairperson, an HP lawyer, and two investigators. Four charges: using of false or fraudulent pretenses to obtain confidential information from a public utility, unauthorized access to computer data, identity theft, and conspiracy. All of the offenses are felonies.

Innocent until proven guilty.

2:35 PM, October 04, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

One more person charged: the former HP chief ethics officer.

2:39 PM, October 04, 2006  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home