Wednesday, May 17, 2006

Socket AM2 Athlon 64 X2 3800+ fanless opreation

This site tested the AM2 Athlon 64 X2 3800+ dual core CPU operating without a fan ! Core temperature was at 42C with the fan, without the fan, temperature rose to 49C.

12 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

"Core temperature was at 42C with the fan, without the fan, temperature rose to 49C."

You're confusing different tests, the 42C max with a fan were reached running an instance of SP2004, at full load.

During the fanless tests, it reached 32C at boot up, 36C after 1 minute. 42C were reached after 5 minutes and 49C after 7 minutes, at which point the test was ended. All that's while idling on the windows desktop.

.
Oh, and btw, they didn't test an X2, it's a single-core 3800+ processor they had.

9:14 PM, May 17, 2006  
Blogger Sharikou, Ph. D said...

During the fanless tests, ... All that's while idling on the windows desktop.

.
Oh, and btw, they didn't test an X2, it's a single-core 3800+ processor they had.


1) The clockspeed was at 2GHZ, so it's not running at low P state.

2) It was a X2 3800, see pic

11:06 PM, May 17, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

i'm not quite sure i understand the reason you post this up...

11:21 PM, May 17, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

MOG Intel will be screaming in the dark, Paul may even take the money and do a dive of the high board.

11:39 PM, May 17, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"The clockspeed was at 2GHZ, so it's not running at low P state."

Probably true, doesn't change the fact that you're trying to compare a fully loaded CPU with fan to one idling without. (The real comparison is 36C for idling with fan, 50+C after 7 minutes without and no idea when it'll stop working/throttle/crash)

"It was a X2 3800"

I saw the pics and I saw the markings on the IHS, but from looking at the following shots, one can only see a single active core:

http://product.pcpop.com/000027400/Picture/000169168.html
http://product.pcpop.com/000027400/Picture/000169210.html
http://product.pcpop.com/000027400/Picture/000169211.html
http://product.pcpop.com/000027400/Picture/000169283.html

So while they seem to have had a X2 3800+ at hand, it ran like a single-core 3200+ (not the 3800+ I wrote above) during their tests. (I'm guessing it's a problem with the motherboard and/or BIOS)

The whole fanless test only makes sense as a test of the heatsink material and mass. And I'm not impressed by a 3200+ that reaches 50C in a mere 7 minutes while idling on the windows desktop.

My conclusion: Bad heatsink for that job. (or rather: One not designed to do the task asked of him)

11:44 PM, May 17, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Woodcrest looks much better than planned
The last part, less power, is the big one. I am told Woodcrest will be coming in with a 65W TDP. This is big news, and by no means a minor drop, it is on the order of 20%, and will most likely send AMD scrambling. Whatever magic Intel pulled off, well done. ยต\

http://www.theinquirer.net/?article=31789

6:03 AM, May 18, 2006  
Blogger Sharikou, Ph. D said...

Woodcrest looks much better than planned

AMD's dual core Opteron HE was 55 watt 9 months ago.

Read the report below:
http://issj.sys-con.com/read/117897.htm

2x dual core Opteron (4 cores), 8GB ram, 1TB HDD, total max system power 145 watts.


And I'm not impressed by a 3200+ that reaches 50C in a mere 7 minutes while idling on the windows desktop.

According to AMD, AM2 consumes 14 watts when running SysMark2004. Yes. They should have used a copper heatsink in the fanless test. Instead, they used the stock heatsink for a sempron 2500+ without the fan.

8:16 AM, May 18, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"AMD's dual core Opteron HE was 55 watt 9 months ago.

Read the report below:
http://issj.sys-con.com/read/117897.htm

"

I did a search of 55 on the page, didn't find anything match. All I got is this:
"
Rackable Systems' new C2002 server, winner of the Best Server award, draws an astoundingly low peak of 145 watts in a configuration featuring two dual-core 1.8 GHz AMD Opteron HE processors (four total cores), 8 GB DDR400 RAM and one terabyte of SATA storage leveraging Hitachi 500 GB hard drives, with a mere 500 BTU/hour of peak thermal output.
"

9:10 AM, May 18, 2006  
Anonymous Edward said...

"I saw the pics and I saw the markings on the IHS, but from looking at the following shots, one can only see a single active core:"

Did you see this page where it clearly shows dual active cores?

What you saw was temperature sensor measurements. There is only one temperature sensor for the CPU.

9:46 AM, May 18, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"What you saw was temperature sensor measurements. There is only one temperature sensor for the CPU."

No, what I saw was (a) CPU-Z with a darkened-out core selection, (b) the Windows Task Manager showing only one core and (c) only a single instance of SP2004 run to stress the processor.

Right now, I can't fathom the idea that the shot you linked and the shots I linked earlier came from the same install or even system.

1:47 PM, May 18, 2006  
Anonymous Edward said...

"Right now, I can't fathom the idea that the shot you linked and the shots I linked earlier came from the same install or even system."

Click at the "next link" on the first apge you linked and you'll get to the shot I linked.

That said, I agree that the credibility of the "under load" tests is in doubt. ;-)

4:36 PM, May 18, 2006  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"Click at the "next link" on the first apge you linked and you'll get to the shot I linked."

I'm sorry I wasn't clear about this, I was not questioning you, but rather the test as it's showing inconsistent results for what is supposed to be a single test-rig.

2:00 AM, May 20, 2006  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home